So They Came: Young Men Farmers

Hello Everyone,

Once again the Oxford Historical Society had the privilege of participating in the Oxford County Library’s Annual Oxford Local History Day! For this event Elaine Becker created a video about her latest publication – So They Came: Young Men Farmers. Her video presentation and the 16 other local history presentations are available on the Oxford County Library YouTube channel.

Please enjoy watching Elaine’s presentation of So They Came: Young Men Farmers!

The book So They Came: Young Men Farmers is available for purchase for $20.00 (taxes included), either by contacting the Oxford Historical Society directly at info@oxhs.ca, 226-242-4774, or for pick-up at the Woodstock Museum, NHS.

Zoom Meeting Tonight – Wednesday, April 27, 2022 @ 6:30pm – Queen of the Con

Please join the Oxford Historical Society on Wednesday, April 27, 2022, at 6:30pm, for a Zoom presentation by Thomas Crowl. Thomas will discuss his latest work: Queen of the Con: From Spiritualist to Carnegie Imposter!

Thomas delves into the many schemes undertaken by Cassie Chadwick. He explores her life from her humble beginnings as Elizabeth Bigley, born in Oxford County, to her becoming a clairvoyant, a fraudster, an imposter posing as Andrew Carnegie’s illegitimate daughter and many other cons along the way.

This book is available for purchase from Amazon.ca using this link – Queen of the Con: From a Spiritualist to the Carnegie Imposter


The Zoom link is: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81906248857

For all Zoom meetings use this ID#: 81906248857, no password is required.

The Zoom link will open approximately 10 minutes before the start time of a meeting

Queen of the Con Zoom Presentation – Wednesday, April 27, 2022 @ 6:30pm

Please join the Oxford Historical Society on Wednesday, April 27, 2022, at 6:30pm, for a Zoom presentation by Thomas Crowl. Thomas will discuss his latest work: Queen of the Con: From Spiritualist to Carnegie Imposter!

Thomas delves into the many schemes undertaken by Cassie Chadwick. He explores her life from her humble beginnings as Elizabeth Bigley, born in Oxford County, to her becoming a clairvoyant, a fraudster, an imposter posing as Andrew Carnegie’s illegitimate daughter and many other cons along the way.

This book is available for purchase from Amazon.ca using this link – Queen of the Con: From a Spiritualist to the Carnegie Imposter


The Zoom link is: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81906248857

For all Zoom meetings use this ID#: 81906248857, no password is required.

The Zoom link will open approximately 10 minutes before the start time of a meeting

Oxford Local History Day 2022!

Hello Everyone,
This guest post is provided by Oxford County Libraries.

Please join the Oxford County Libraries as the once again celebrate Oxford County’s Local History!

Mark Saturday, April 23, 2022 as the day to enjoy seminars, presentations and stories from Oxford County.

Experience collections, exhibits & featured stories from archives, museums & heritage groups from around Oxford County, as we celebrate our local history.  Watch Oxford County Library Facebook Live & YouTube Channel throughout the day as focused presentations bring to light the story of Oxford.

Oxford County. We’ve made history!

Oxford Historical Society Meeting Tonight – Wednesday, March 30, 2022 – Old Houses as Museums

Craigdarroch Museum,
Photo Courtesy of Beachville District Museum

Please join us on Wednesday, March 30 at 6:45pm at the Woodstock Museum, NHS as we welcome Dr. Stephanie Radu, Curator of the Beachville District Museum.

The following is a summary of Dr. Radu’s upcoming presentation:

Historic house museums are a common, if often overlooked, feature of the Canadian heritage landscape. As national historic sites, and community museums, they address cultural, social, historical and political facets of the past. Whether they recount the life of a previous owner, focus on how chores in early households were completed, give visitors a sense of how their foundations were built or walls were decorated, they reflect different regional identities, varied stories of domestic life and different architectural traditions. This presentation looks across examples from the west coast (British Columbia) to the east (Nova Scotia) and offers references to local examples in between. It looks at how closets are transformed into display cabinets for historic housewares, how antique lighting fixtures are converted into appropriate “Exit” lights and how entire dining table sets become frozen for viewing.

In exploring these transformations, the presentation looks at how private, domestic spaces are re-envisioned as public institutions. It further looks at how multisensory exhibits, interactive displays and participative programs are used to restage the environment of historic homes for the enjoyment and education of museum visitors. Be ready to step inside of Canada’s historic homes and as well as back in time. 

The Woodstock Museum, NHS follows the direction of the Ontario Government public health protocols – which may include wearing masks, physical distancing and passive screening. Please be respectful of others while in a public area.

Volunteers Needed for Upcoming Garden Tour

Calling all Woodstock gardeners! The Woodstock Museum and Oxford Historical Society want help show off your beautiful gardens with a tour on Saturday, June 18.

The Museum and OxHS have previously organized the popular Spirit of Christmas Tour of Homes fundraiser. This year we are looking to hold a garden tour as a safe, outdoor alternative. If you are interested in participating, please contact Kerrie Gill at the Woodstock Museum at 519-537-8411 ext. 2903 by March 31 for details.

The tour will run rain or shine from 10am – 2pm. Volunteers will be assigned to each garden to provide assistance during the tour. We also recommend the homeowner and/or gardener be available to answer questions about the plants or the history of the house.

Oxford Local History Day 2022

Hello Everyone,
This guest post is provided by Oxford County Libraries.

Your invitation to participate in Oxford Local History Day 2022!

Oxford County Library will again be taking the spirit of Oxford Local History Day online with our 2nd annual event celebrating the history of Oxford County.

On Saturday, April 23 we are hoping to again showcase a full day of virtual local history presentations that will bring to light the story of Oxford. Experience collections, exhibits & featured stories from archives, museums & heritage groups from around Oxford County.  

Are you interested in telling the story of Oxford? Consider creating a short video or a narrated slide presentation to provide education around your collections and promote your organization that could be featured on Oxford County Library social media sometime during Oxford Local History Day.

Explore our outstanding submissions from 2021 on the Oxford County Library YouTube Channel:

If you would like to participate in this initiative, please indicate your willingness to do so by Monday, March 28.  Video presentation submission deadline is Thursday, April 14.

Oxford County. We’ve made history!

Contact: VICKI BRENNER
Digital & Local History Technician | Oxford County Library
519-485-2505 ext. 3280 | vbrenner@ocl.net

Klondikers: Dawson City’s Stanley Cup Challenge & How a Nation Fell in Love with Hockey

Hello Everyone,

This guest post is from one of our members, George Calder.

George has this to say about Tim Falconer’s newest publication:

The author is Tim Falconer who is familiar with the Yukon but lives in Toronto. The book is a great record of the growth of the game of hockey in Canada. But it also focuses on the assistance given to it by Joseph Whiteside Boyle and the hockey team from the Yukon managed by him that challenged for the Stanley Cup in 1905. A great read.

From the GoodReads website:

Join a ragtag group of misfits from Dawson City as they scrap to become the 1905 Stanley Cup champions and cement hockey as Canada’s national pastime An underdog hockey team traveled for three and a half weeks from Dawson City to Ottawa to play for the Stanley Cup in 1905. The Klondikers’ eagerness to make the journey, and the public’s enthusiastic response, revealed just how deeply, and how quickly, Canadians had fallen in love with hockey. After Governor General Stanley donated a championship trophy in 1893, new rinks appeared in big cities and small towns, leading to more players, teams, and leagues. And more fans. When Montreal challenged Winnipeg for the Cup in December 1896, supporters in both cities followed the play-by-play via telegraph updates. As the country escaped the Victorian era and entered a promising new century, a different nation was emerging. Canadians fell for hockey amid industrialization, urbanization, and shifting social and cultural attitudes. Class and race-based British ideals of amateurism attempted to fend off a more egalitarian professionalism. Ottawa star Weldy Young moved to the Yukon in 1899, and within a year was talking about a Cup challenge. With the help of Klondike businessman Joe Boyle, it finally happened six years later. Ottawa pounded the exhausted visitors, with”One-Eyed” Frank McGee scoring an astonishing 14 goals in one game. But there was no doubt hockey was now the national pastime.

If you wish to purchase this book you can do so through the GoodReads website or through amazon.ca.

Upcoming Speaker: Wednesday, March 30, 2022 – Old Houses as Museums

Craigdarroch Museum,
Photo Courtesy of Beachville District Museum

Please join us on Wednesday, March 30 at 6:45pm at the Woodstock Museum, NHS as we welcome Dr. Stephanie Radu, Curator of the Beachville District Museum.

The following is a summary of Dr. Radu’s upcoming presentation:

Historic house museums are a common, if often overlooked, feature of the Canadian heritage landscape. As national historic sites, and community museums, they address cultural, social, historical and political facets of the past. Whether they recount the life of a previous owner, focus on how chores in early households were completed, give visitors a sense of how their foundations were built or walls were decorated, they reflect different regional identities, varied stories of domestic life and different architectural traditions. This presentation looks across examples from the west coast (British Columbia) to the east (Nova Scotia) and offers references to local examples in between. It looks at how closets are transformed into display cabinets for historic housewares, how antique lighting fixtures are converted into appropriate “Exit” lights and how entire dining table sets become frozen for viewing.

In exploring these transformations, the presentation looks at how private, domestic spaces are re-envisioned as public institutions. It further looks at how multisensory exhibits, interactive displays and participative programs are used to restage the environment of historic homes for the enjoyment and education of museum visitors. Be ready to step inside of Canada’s historic homes and as well as back in time.